Saturday, October 27, 2018

Weekly Outlook for Week of 10-28-18

This week, the Moon will begin to wane and rise later every night. As the week progresses, this will
give objects such as M31, M33, and the Perseus double cluster their chance to shine. In fact, the
Winter constellations such as Andromeda are becoming more prominent every night while the
Summer triangle is becoming low in the Western sky. Even Auriga, with its many open clusters, is
prominent in the sky by midnight. Here are your planet rise/set times thanks to the US Navy!


Mercury:
2018 Oct 28 (Sun)        09:19 119 13:59 26S        18:38 241
2018 Oct 29 (Mon)        09:22 120 14:00 26S        18:38 240
2018 Oct 30 (Tue)        09:25 120 14:01 26S        18:38 240
2018 Oct 31 (Wed)        09:27 121 14:03 25S        18:38 239
2018 Nov 01 (Thu)        09:30 121 14:04 25S        18:37 239
2018 Nov 02 (Fri)        09:32 122 14:05 25S        18:37 238
2018 Nov 03 (Sat)        09:34 122 14:06 25S        18:37 238    


Venus:
2018 Oct 28 (Sun)        07:17 113 12:13 31S        17:09 247
2018 Oct 29 (Mon)        07:09 113 12:07 31S        17:05 247
2018 Oct 30 (Tue)        07:02 112 12:01 31S        17:01 248
2018 Oct 31 (Wed)        06:55 112 11:55 32S        16:57 248
2018 Nov 01 (Thu)        06:47 111 11:50 32S        16:53 249
2018 Nov 02 (Fri)        06:40 111 11:44 33S        16:49 250
2018 Nov 03 (Sat)        06:33 110 11:38 33S        16:45 250


Mars:
2018 Oct 28 (Sun)        14:54 113 19:52 31S        00:52 247
2018 Oct 29 (Mon)        14:52 113 19:51 31S        00:51 247
2018 Oct 30 (Tue)        14:49 112 19:49 31S        00:50 247
2018 Oct 31 (Wed)        14:46 112 19:47 32S        00:49 248
2018 Nov 01 (Thu)        14:44 112 19:45 32S        00:48 248
2018 Nov 02 (Fri)        14:41 111 19:44 32S        00:47 248
2018 Nov 03 (Sat)        14:38 111 19:42 32S        00:46 249


Jupiter:
2018 Oct 28 (Sun)        09:14 115 14:05 29S        18:56 245
2018 Oct 29 (Mon)        09:11 115 14:02 29S        18:53 245
2018 Oct 30 (Tue)        09:08 115 13:59 29S        18:49 245
2018 Oct 31 (Wed)        09:05 115 13:56 29S        18:46 244
2018 Nov 01 (Thu)        09:02 116 13:53 29S        18:43 244
2018 Nov 02 (Fri)        08:59 116 13:49 29S        18:40 244
2018 Nov 03 (Sat)        08:57 116 13:46 29S        18:36 244


Saturn:
2018 Oct 28 (Sun)        12:08 121 16:42 25S        21:17 239
2018 Oct 29 (Mon)        12:04 121 16:39 25S        21:13 239
2018 Oct 30 (Tue)        12:01 121 16:35 25S        21:10 239
2018 Oct 31 (Wed)        11:57 121 16:32 25S        21:06 239
2018 Nov 01 (Thu)        11:53 121 16:28 25S        21:03 239
2018 Nov 02 (Fri)        11:50 121 16:24 25S        20:59 239
2018 Nov 03 (Sat)        11:46 121 16:21 25S        20:55 239


Uranus:
2018 Oct 28 (Sun)        17:32 75 00:19 59S        07:01 285
2018 Oct 29 (Mon)        17:28 75 00:15 59S        06:57 285
2018 Oct 30 (Tue)        17:24 75 00:10 59S        06:53 285
2018 Oct 31 (Wed)        17:20 75 00:06 59S        06:49 285
2018 Nov 01 (Thu)        17:16 75 00:02 59S        06:44 285
2018 Nov 02 (Fri)        17:12 75 23:54 59S        06:40 285
2018 Nov 03 (Sat)        17:08 75 23:50 59S        06:36 285


Neptune:
2018 Oct 28 (Sun)        15:47 99 21:23 41S        03:03 261
2018 Oct 29 (Mon)        15:43 99 21:19 41S        02:59 261
2018 Oct 30 (Tue)        15:40 99 21:15 41S        02:55 261
2018 Oct 31 (Wed)        15:36 99 21:11 41S        02:51 261
2018 Nov 01 (Thu)        15:32 99 21:07 41S        02:47 261
2018 Nov 02 (Fri)        15:28 99 21:04 41S        02:43 261
2018 Nov 03 (Sat)        15:24 99 21:00 41S        02:39 261    

NGC 7662 in X-ray and Visible Light. Image Credit: NASA
NGC 7662, Snowball Nebula: Located in the constellation of Andromeda, NGC 7662 is a bright
planetary nebula between .35 and .70 light years in diameter. This uncertainty in size is due to the
fact that its distance is also relatively unknown, with estimates ranging 2000 light years. (1800-4000
light years) Like other planetary nebulae, the snowball is the result of a sun like star near the end of
its lifetime shedding away its skin of outer gasses. Though the nebula is bright, it is very small, and
requires a telescope to distinguish it from a star. However, a medium sized telescope will reveal some
of its structural detail. NGC 7662 is best seen in mid to late Fall and early Winter when Andromeda is
high in the sky. In addition to this, the crisp Autumn air is great for seeing conditions, especially for
such a small object.

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