Saturday, November 17, 2018

Weekly Outlook for Week of 11-17-18

This week on the 23rd, the Moon will be full. Although this will make some deep sky objects such as
galaxies and nebulae harder to see, objects such as open clusters (and the Moon!) will still be readily
available. In fact, each night the Pleiades and Hyades star cluster become more prominent. Because
both clusters are large and bright, they are typically better seen with binoculars than a telescope.
Here are your planet rise/set times thanks to the US Navy!


Mercury:
2018 Nov 18 (Sun)        08:18 123 12:46 24S        17:15 237
2018 Nov 19 (Mon)        08:12 122 12:41 24S        17:10 238
2018 Nov 20 (Tue)        08:04 122 12:35 25S        17:06 238
2018 Nov 21 (Wed)        07:56 121 12:28 25S        17:00 239
2018 Nov 22 (Thu)        07:47 121 12:20 25S        16:55 240
2018 Nov 23 (Fri)        07:37 120 12:12 26S        16:49 240
2018 Nov 24 (Sat)        07:26 119 12:03 26S        16:42 241


Venus:
2018 Nov 18 (Sun)        04:09 104 09:33 38S        14:57 256
2018 Nov 19 (Mon)        04:05 104 09:30 38S        14:54 256
2018 Nov 20 (Tue)        04:02 103 09:27 38S        14:52 257
2018 Nov 21 (Wed)        03:58 103 09:24 38S        14:49 257
2018 Nov 22 (Thu)        03:55 103 09:21 38S        14:47 257
2018 Nov 23 (Fri)        03:52 103 09:18 38S        14:44 257
2018 Nov 24 (Sat)        03:49 103 09:16 38S        14:42 257   


Mars:
2018 Nov 18 (Sun)        12:59 106 18:17 36S        23:35 254
2018 Nov 19 (Mon)        12:56 106 18:15 36S        23:34 254
2018 Nov 20 (Tue)        12:54 105 18:13 36S        23:34 255
2018 Nov 21 (Wed)        12:51 105 18:12 37S        23:33 255
2018 Nov 22 (Thu)        12:49 105 18:10 37S        23:32 255
2018 Nov 23 (Fri)        12:46 104 18:09 37S        23:32 256
2018 Nov 24 (Sat)        12:43 104 18:07 37S        23:31 256   
Jupiter:
2018 Nov 18 (Sun)        07:14 117 12:01 28S        16:48 243
2018 Nov 19 (Mon)        07:11 117 11:58 28S        16:45 243
2018 Nov 20 (Tue)        07:08 117 11:55 28S        16:42 243
2018 Nov 21 (Wed)        07:06 117 11:52 28S        16:38 243
2018 Nov 22 (Thu)        07:03 117 11:49 28S        16:35 243
2018 Nov 23 (Fri)        07:00 117 11:46 28S        16:32 243
2018 Nov 24 (Sat)        06:57 117 11:43 28S        16:29 243


Saturn:
2018 Nov 18 (Sun)        09:53 121 14:28 25S        19:03 239
2018 Nov 19 (Mon)        09:50 121 14:24 25S        18:59 239
2018 Nov 20 (Tue)        09:46 121 14:21 25S        18:56 239
2018 Nov 21 (Wed)        09:43 121 14:17 25S        18:52 239
2018 Nov 22 (Thu)        09:39 121 14:14 25S        18:49 239
2018 Nov 23 (Fri)        09:36 121 14:10 25S        18:45 239
2018 Nov 24 (Sat)        09:32 121 14:07 25S        18:42 239


Uranus:
2018 Nov 18 (Sun)        15:08 75 21:49 59S        04:34 285
2018 Nov 19 (Mon)        15:04 75 21:45 59S        04:30 285
2018 Nov 20 (Tue)        15:00 75 21:41 59S        04:26 285
2018 Nov 21 (Wed)        14:56 75 21:37 59S        04:22 285
2018 Nov 22 (Thu)        14:51 75 21:33 59S        04:18 285
2018 Nov 23 (Fri)        14:47 75 21:29 59S        04:14 285
2018 Nov 24 (Sat)        14:43 75 21:25 59S        04:10 285


Neptune:
2018 Nov 18 (Sun)        13:24 99 19:00 41S        00:40 261
2018 Nov 19 (Mon)        13:20 99 18:56 41S        00:36 261
2018 Nov 20 (Tue)        13:17 99 18:52 41S        00:32 261
2018 Nov 21 (Wed)        13:13 99 18:48 41S        00:28 261
2018 Nov 22 (Thu)        13:09 99 18:44 41S        00:24 261
2018 Nov 23 (Fri)        13:05 99 18:40 41S        00:20 261
2018 Nov 24 (Sat)        13:01 99 18:37 41S        00:16 261


1-M45_Robert_Terry_LRGB
Image Credit: Robert Fields and Terry Hancock The Pleiades (M45): The Pleiades (pronounced play-dees) star cluster is perhaps one of the brightest and most noticeable star clusters. Even under a full moon, this impressive cluster still appears as a rather bright smudge with the naked eye. When the moon isn’t there you can see the seven sisters in their full glory, illuminated from the back by a bright smudge. The Pleiades formed together in the same cloud of molecular hydrogen. As the hydrogen collapsed, stars were ignited and fusion began. As more stars formed, more hydrogen was used. Today, only a small amount of gas and dust remains. The stars travel through space together but are not gravitationally bound, which means that they are slowly drifting apart. Because of this, the cluster will slowly break apart. WIth a telescope at low power or binoculars you will find that this cluster is composed of hundreds of stars. Due to the size of this cluster it is recommended to have a wide field of view, making binoculars the most ideal choice for viewing the Pleiades. To locate the sisters trace a straight line right from Orion’s Belt, through Taurus the bull until you see a fuzzy patch on the sky.

     

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